Roundtable Staff Objectives

Roundtables are a form of commissioner service and supplemental training for volunteers at all levels. The objective of roundtables is to give leaders program ideas; information on policy, events, and training opportunities; and an opportunity to share experiences and enjoy fun and fellowship with other Scouting leaders. The roundtable commissioner and staff demonstrate elements of a model meeting that leaders may use as a pattern for their own meetings. The roundtable experience will inspire, motivate, and enable unit leaders to provide a stronger program for their Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, Webelos and Boy Scouts.

Meeting Times:

Monthly from September to May

The First Thursday night of the month

7 PM - 8 PM

Saint Luke’s United Methodist Church, Danville VA

Follow by Email

If you are a Scouting Unit in the Dan River/Halifax Area and would like to add an event to the calendar, please send details to me in an email. You can email me by clicking HERE

Dan River District Calendar (There is more stuff below calendar)

Click event for more details

Click Here for Larger Calendar Page

Commissioners Corner Pages

Summit Shakedown 2012

Friday, December 19, 2008

New ‘Annual Health and Medical Record’ to Replace Class 1, 2, & 3 Health Forms

The Boy Scouts of America has released a new Annual Health and Medical Record, a new one stop medical record for your use. This new form will replace the former Class 1, 2, and 3 forms, which will be phased out during 2009. The new form, No. 34605, will be required effective January 1, 2010, and for the 2010 National Scout Jamboree.

Links to download the new form are below.

The form consists of three parts:
Parts A and C are to be completed annually by all BSA unit members. Both parts are required for all events that do not exceed 72 consecutive hours, where the level of activity is similar to that normally expended at home or at school, such as day camp, day hikes, swimming parties, or an overnight camp, and where medical care is readily available. Medical information required includes a current health history and list of medications. Part C also includes the parental informed consent and hold harmless/release agreement (with an area for notarization if required by your state) as well as a talent release statement. Adult unit leaders should review participants' health histories and become knowledgeable about the medical needs of the youth members in their unit. This form is to
be filled out by participants and parents or guardians and kept on file for easy reference.

Part B is required with parts A and C for any event that exceeds 72 consecutive hours, a resident camp setting, or when the nature of the activity is strenuous and demanding, such as service projects, work weekends, or high-adventure treks. It is to be completed and signed by a certified and licensed health-care provider—physician (MD, DO), nurse practitioner, or physician's assistant as appropriate for your state. The level of activity ranges from what is normally expended at home or at school to strenuous activity such as hiking and backpacking. Other examples include tour camping, jamborees, and Wood Badge training courses. It is important to note that the height/weight chart must be strictly adhered to if the event will take the unit beyond a radius wherein emergency evacuation is more than 30 minutes by ground transportation, such as backpacking trips, high-adventure activities, and conservation projects in remote areas.

The new pdf version of the form can be filled out on your computer and saved for future updates. It comes with warnings against units emailing or saving electronically the forms.

A few snippets from the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

Q. What are the major changes?
A. A health history is still sufficient for typical activities lasting less than 72 hours (Parts A and C of the new form—similar to the old Class 1 form). For activities lasting longer than 72 hours, a medical evaluation by a health-care provider is now required annually (Part B). For high-adventure activities for which medical care may be delayed, restrictions based on standardized height/weight ratios are now mandatory.

Q. When does the Annual Health and Medical Record go into effect?
A. Everyone should begin using the Annual Health and Medical Record immediately. The existing stock of Class 1, 2, and 3 forms can continue to be used while supplies last in 2009. The only supported form effective January 1, 2010, is the Annual Health and Medical Record. Its use will be mandatory for the 2010 National Scout Jamboree.

Q. How often will I need to renew/update my Annual Health and Medical Record?
A. This form will need to be updated annually, just as many schools or sporting leagues require an annual update. Many changes can happen throughout a year, including changes in disease processes, medication, address, and insurance.

Q. Why do I need to put my child's or my own social security number on the record?
A. It is your choice as to whether you fill in this number; however, in many states, medical care cannot be rendered without it.

Read the rest of the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

The new forms come in two printing styles:
- Annual Health and Medical Record (Prints on four 8.5 x 11 sheets)
- Annual Health and Medical Record spread (Prints on two 8.5 x 11 sheets)

The new Annual Health and Medical Record cites two additional forms:
- Immunization Exemption Request - Request for exemption from tetanus immunization requirement.
- Medical Care Exemption Request - Request for exemption from medical care.

Both of which, according to the Scouting Safely section of the National Council website, will be coming soon.

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Guide to Safe... Winter camping from The Scoutmaster Minute by tbirdironchef@gmail.com (Jerry)

The Guide to Safe Scouting Section 13 outlines Winter Camping Safety.
I have posted it here in it's entirety:

There is magic to camping in winter. It is one of the most advanced and challenging of outdoor adventures. Special considerations for winter camping include the following:
1. Leadership.
In no other camp is the type of leadership as important as in the winter camp. It is vital that a leader be an experienced camper with a strong character.
2. Equipment.
Do not attempt to camp unless completely outfitted. Even if equipment for winter camp is more expensive than for summer camp, Scouts must be adequately clothed, and leaders should ensure that blankets and other equipment are of suitable quality and weight.
3. Physical Condition.
A physician's certificate as to physical ability must be obtained by each Scout before preliminary training begins.


Tips for your next winter camping trip:
1. Use the buddy system for winter outings. Buddies can check each other for frostbite, make sure no one becomes lost, and boost the morale of the entire group.
2. Plan to cover no more than five miles per day on a winter trek on snowshoes. An experienced group can cover 10 to 12 miles on cross-country skis.
3. Always allow ample time to make camp in winter, especially if you plan to build snow shelters. 4. Fatigue encourages accidents. Rest occasionally when building a snow shelter; taking part in cross-country skiing or snowshoeing; or participating in other active winter sports. Periodic rests also help avoid overheating.
5. Pulling a load over the snow on a sled or toboggan is generally easier than carrying it in a backpack.
6. Snow is a terrific insulator. Snow shelters are much warmer than tents because they retain heat and keep out the cold wind. If you have adequate time for building snow shelters, you will spend a much more comfortable night sleeping in them than in a tent.
7. Snow is the greatest thief in winter, swallowing up small dropped items. Tie or tape a piece of brightly colored cord to small items so they can be seen in snow. Some items, such as mittens, can be tied to larger items, such as a parka, to prevent them from being dropped and lost.
8. Melting snow in a pot to get water may cause the pot to burn through or may scorch the snow, giving the water a disagreeable taste. Prevent this by adding a cup or two of water in the bottom of the pot before putting in the snow to melt.
9. Punch a hole in the top of your ice chisel and string a stout cord through it. Before trying to chisel a hole in ice, anchor the cord to something large or too heavy to be pulled through the hole so you will not lose your chisel in freezing water when the ice is penetrated.
10. Always test the thickness of ice before venturing any distance from the shore. Ice should be at least 3 inches thick for a small group; 4 inches of ice is safe for a crowd. Since ice thickness can vary considerably, it is best to stay near the shoreline of large lakes.
11. Use alkaline batteries in flashlights. Standard batteries deteriorate quickly in cold weather. Tape the switch of your flashlight in the "off" position until you are ready to use it. This will prevent it from being turned on accidentally while in your pack or on your sled.
12. Encourage everyone in your group to wear brightly colored outer clothing so that each person will be more visible, especially during severe weather.
13. Small liquid-fuel stoves are much better for cooking in winter than fires, which are difficult to build with wet wood. Gathering wood that is frozen to the ground also can be difficult, if not impossible. A pressure/pump-type stove is essential in winter.
14. Always use a funnel to refuel a stove so you won't frostbite your fingers by accidentally pouring fuel on them. Fuel evaporates at a high rate of speed and quickly removes heat from anything it touches.
15. Place a stove or fire on a platform of logs or rocks so it will not melt through the snow.
16. Never light or use a stove inside a tent or snow shelter. A tent may catch fire, and vapors in a snow shelter may lead to carbon monoxide poisoning. Neither of these potential mishaps is worth the risk.
17. A windscreen is essential for using a stove in the winter. Even a slight breeze will direct the heat away from its intended mark.

References: Okpik: Cold Weather Camping, Boy Scout Handbook, Scoutmaster Handbook, and Camping Sparklers

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Teaching Scout about the COLD from The Scoutmaster Minute by tbirdironchef@gmail.com (Jerry)

COLD is a tool that makes learning about cold weather camping lasting. It is an easy tool that the boys can remember and it is simple enough to retain.

C- Clean.
You need to stay clean in a cold weather environment Dirt on clothing acts like a wick for wet and cold. Keeping your clothing clean will keep you dry and warm.
Keeping your body clean is a great way to stay warm also.
Oily skins gets your sleeping bag dirty. As you sweat in your sleeping bag you can start to break down the warming qualities of your bag. Opening the pours of your bag.
You need to maintain a clean body. A simple wipe down before heading into the bag for the night will keep you snug and warm.

O- Overheating.
KEEP from overheating. Control your temperature by watching what you do and what you wear. As activities increase, loose clothing. Use zippers and hats to regulate heat/cold. If your get cold, put more on, as you warm up, unzip arm pits and take off the hat.
Reduce the amount of sweat sitting on your skin. Sweat freezes and as it evaporates it takes away your body heat. A real fast way to loose heat and lower your core temp is to sweat. Keep from sweating.

L- Loose in Layers.
Dress for Success.. Loose and in layers.
Loose creates air pockets. Those air pockets heat you up as they fill with the body heat. Keeping the heat in those layers will keep you warm. Layers are key. Start with your base layer, the clothing on your skin. Sweat wicking and NO COTTON. Then throw on your mid layers. The clothing that keeps you warm. Outer layers that keep you away from the elements. And all of this layered. Remove or add layers as needed.

D- Dry.
Staying Dry is the key to warmth. Weather that is dry from wet conditions or sweat. Staying dry with keep you warm. Staying warm will ensure a great time in the winter camping.

Monday, December 1, 2008

Thursday December 4th meeting.

Good morning.  I just wanted to confirm that I will be there this Thursday to quickly present to you guys on everything we have to offer for the Boy Scouts of this region.  Thanks for opportunity!

Adam Goebel

Danville Science Center

434-791-5160 x200

www.dsc.smv.org

 

 


Roundtable Help

This weeks subject will be on Community Service. If you know of any organization that scouts can call or visit for community service, please reply back with the contact information. I will make a sheet to hand out Thursday night. Please reply as soon as possible, thanks.


David Hyler

If you really want to do something, You will make a way. If you don't, You will make an excuse.

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