Roundtable Staff Objectives

Roundtables are a form of commissioner service and supplemental training for volunteers at all levels. The objective of roundtables is to give leaders program ideas; information on policy, events, and training opportunities; and an opportunity to share experiences and enjoy fun and fellowship with other Scouting leaders. The roundtable commissioner and staff demonstrate elements of a model meeting that leaders may use as a pattern for their own meetings. The roundtable experience will inspire, motivate, and enable unit leaders to provide a stronger program for their Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, Webelos and Boy Scouts.

Meeting Times:

Monthly from September to May

The First Thursday night of the month

7 PM - 8 PM

Saint Luke’s United Methodist Church, Danville VA

Follow by Email

If you are a Scouting Unit in the Dan River/Halifax Area and would like to add an event to the calendar, please send details to me in an email. You can email me by clicking HERE

Dan River District Calendar (There is more stuff below calendar)

Click event for more details

Click Here for Larger Calendar Page

Commissioners Corner Pages

Summit Shakedown 2012

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Service Hours Available

The Patriot Guard just called me. They will be laying wreaths on Veterans graves on Saturday Dec 15 at noon.
At the National Cemetery on Lee Street.
Any scouts that are interested in joining in are welcome. Please come in uniform.
No need to Register, just show up at noon.

Monday, November 5, 2012

November Roundtable


Activitiy


Reactor Transporter

Required:

Per patrol:

  • 3 staffs or poles, about 6 feet long
  • 3 poles, about 4 feet long
  • 7 pieces of rope or cord, 10 feet long
  • 20 feet of twine
  • 1 #10 size can
  • 1 1/2inch metal nut

Preparation:


  • Create a 'Reactor Bell' for each patrol:
  • Punch a hole in the bottom of the can.
  • Run the twine through the hole and tie a knot, leaving about 1 foot of twine in the can.
  • To the end of this twine, tie the nut so it swings inside the can like the clapper of a bell.

Notes:


  • Good for lashings, leadership, teamwork.
  • Can be done as a single patrol or a troop competition.
  • Goal: Transport a radioactive reactor core to a safe disposal site using your self-made transporter. 
  • Each patrol uses their materials to construct a tripod pyramid by lashing the poles together. 
  • The reactor is hung by the twine from the top of the pyramid so it hangs freely.
  • The transporter is moved to the 'safe zone' - the finish line about 100 feet away.
  • If the reactor bell sounds, there was too much jarring and the patrol must return to the starting line to begin the transport again.

Announcements


November

01 Roundtable
01 Return any unsold popcorn
03 Orders due online by 5pm
06 Skate Night
14 OA Chapter Meeting
15 District Committee Meeting
16 Popcorn Pickup at Dan Valley
17 Scoutmaster/Assistant Scoutmaster Leader Specific Training (Brian Brumfield)

December

06 Roundtable
12 OA Chapter Meeting
13 District Committee Meeting

Other Announcements

Bill Oswald
Chuck Wright
Rob Gunnell
Brian Brumfield
Ed Caviness

Take Roll


Pack    121  -  Present
Pack 123  -  Present
Pack 124  -  Present
Pack 174  -  Present
Pack    329  -  Present
Pack    335  -  Present
Pack 353
Pack 359
Pack 372
Pack 373
Pack 374  -  Present
Pack 376
Pack 377  -  Present
Pack    381
Pack 386  -  Present
Pack 400
Pack 410
Pack 452
Pack 496  -  Present
Pack    784

Post     391
Post     911
Post     364
Crew    67
Crew 361  -  Present
Crew 3046

Troop 068  -  Present
Troop   123  -  Present
Troop   124  -  Present
Troop 175  -  Present
Troop 300
Troop   329  -  Present
Troop 346  -  Present
Troop 354  -  Present
Troop 356
Troop 359
Troop 372
Troop 373  -  Present
Troop 374  -  Present
Troop 376
Troop 377
Troop 378  -  Present
Troop 382
Troop  386  -  Present
Troop 410
Troop 452
Troop 473
Troop 497
Troop  784  -  Present



Commissioners Recipe


Kabobs Recipe

Required:


  • skewers, either bamboo or metal

Ingredients:


  • 1 inch chunks of beef, chicken, shrimp, potatoes, carrots, peppers, onions, apples, pineapple, and anything else you want

Instructions:


  • Scouts skewer alternating chunks of food on their stick.
  • Lay the sticks on a grill over the fire or hold them in hands if the sticks are long enough. Metal marshmallow sticks work well.

  • Serve barbeque sauce, cocktail sauce, dijon mustard, ketchup for dipping. And, watch out for double-dippers!

Thanks to Boy Scout Trial Website

Commissioners Merit Badge

Welding

Requirements for the Welding merit badge:
1- Do the following:


  • Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while welding, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, or lessen these hazards.
  • Show that you know first aid for, and the prevention of, injuries or illnesses that could occur while welding, including electrical shock, eye injuries, burns, fume inhalation, dizziness, skin irritation, and exposure to hazardous chemicals, including filler metals and welding gases.

2- Do the following:


  • With your counselor, discuss general safety precautions and Material Safety Data Sheets related to welding. Explain the importance of the MSDS.
  • Describe the appropriate safety gear and clothing that must be worn when welding. Then, present yourself properly dressed for welding—in protective equipment, clothing, and footwear.
  • Explain and demonstrate the proper care and storage of welding equipment, tools, and protective clothing and footwear.

3- Explain the terms welding, electrode, slag, and oxidation. Describe the welding process, how heat is generated, what kind of filler metal is added (if any), and what protects the molten metal from the atmosphere.
4- Name the different mechanical and thermal cutting methods. Choose one method and describe how to use the process. Discuss one advantage and one limitation of this process.
5- Do the following:


  • Select two welding processes, and make a list of the different components of the equipment required for each process. Discuss one advantage and one limitation for each process.
  • Choose one welding process. Set up the process you have chosen, including gas regulators, work clamps, cables, filler materials, and equipment settings. Have your counselor inspect and approve the area for the welding process you have chosen.

6- After successfully completing requirements 1 through 5, use the equipment you prepared for the welding process in 5b to do the following:


  • Using a metal scribe or soapstone, sketch your initial onto a metal plate, and weld a bead on the plate following the pattern of your initial.
  • Cover a small plate (approximately 3” x 3” x ¼”) with weld beads side by side.
  • Tack two plates together in a square groove butt joint.
  • Weld the two plates together from 6c on both sides.
  • Tack two plates together in a T joint, have your counselor inspect it, then weld a T joint with fillet weld on both sides.
  • Tack two plates together in a lap joint, have your counselor inspect it, then weld a lap joint with fillet weld on both sides.

7- Do the following:


  • Find out about three career opportunities in the welding industry. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why the profession might interest you.
  • Discuss the role of the American Welding Society in the welding profession.


Welding Merit Badge Workbook

Commissioners Game


Bang the Can Relay

Required:


  • 4 metal garbage cans, or coffee cans, or other items that can be hit and make noise.
  • 2 dowels or sticks about 1 foot long for batons.

Preparation:


  • Set the 4 cans out in a large square raceway.

Instructions:


  • Divide in 2 teams or have patrols compete.
  • One team has a starting line halfway between 2 cans. The other team's starting line is halfway between the 2 opposite cans.
  • One team runs clockwise, the other counter-clockwise around the course.
  • One scout from each team starts with their baton in hand. He runs around the square and must hit each can with his baton. If he fails to hit a can hard enough for the judge to hear, he must repeat his lap.
  • When the scout finishes his lap, he hands off the baton to the next scout.
  • The scouts waiting in line must stay out of the way of running scouts.


Thanks to the Boy Scout Trail Website


Commissioners Guest


Robbie Jones from Jones and Sons Welding

Commissioners Minute


You've heard the saying "A chain is only as strong as its weakest link". That's absolutely true. With this chain, I can pull a car or lift a heavy load - I can perform many tasks. But, if I try to lift something that is too heavy, one of the links will break - the weakest link will let down the rest of the chain.

In Scouting, each scout works on personal advancement to strengthen himself and improve his skills. Personal advancement increases the strength of each link in our chain so we can accomplish more.

But, there will always be a weakest link. No matter what the task at hand, some person will be less skilled than the others. Someone will not be able to tie a certain knot, or kindle a fire, or hike as fast, or recite as well as the others. At some point, each of you will be a weakest link - I guarantee it! Being the weakest link is not a shameful thing - it is an opportunity for improvement.

One of the best things about Scouting is that our "chain" is better than a simple metal chain. When we have a task to do, we are not really limited by our weakest link. The other stronger or more skilled or more experienced links support the weaker links. They help them, teach them, and guide them. As a result, we accomplish much more than if we each just did our specific task and left the rest.

Do your best to not be the weakest link - for yourself and for your patrol and for your troop. Learn skills, take on challenges, grow! But, be aware that around here the weakest link one day might be the strongest the next - and the strongest may be the weakest.

Monday, June 11, 2012

BRMC Events

Hot Topics:

  • Be the FACE of SCOUTING at the Greenbrier Classic Golf Tournament- click HERE
  •  What's NEW at Camp this year- Paddleboarding, Ice Climbing, Kayaking Merit Badge, and MORE- click HERE
  • NEW Kayaking Merit Badge- will be available at Camp Powhatan, Camp Ottari, and Claytor Lake Adventure Base this summer!- click HERE
  • NEW National Chief Scout Executive- click HERE
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics- a NEW BSA initiative with Awards for Scouts- click HERE
  • Your "Ideal Year of Scouting" - tools to help you achieve your best Scouting year- clickHERE
  • NEW Office Depot Discount Card- click HERE
  • Summit SHAKEDOWN- YOU can Preview the Bechtel Reserve!- Click HERE
  • Want to see what's going on at the Summit? Check out these videos- click HERE
  • Foxfire National Youth Training Program- sign up NOW-click HERE
  • Start planning NOW to join us for Jamboree!- click HERE
  • NEW Policy on Purchase of Rank Badges- Click HERE
  • NEW Grants for Eagle Projects from Lowes- $100 Gift Cards now available- Click HERE
  • PGA Golf Tournament, The Greenbrier Classic & Concert Series- The BSA has been selected as the Tournament's Charity of Choice - Admission Badges to Benefit BRMC Camperships! - Click HERE
     
  • About the Journey to Excellence- find out what it's all about-click HERE
  • 2012 Friends of Scouting Campaign Reaches 82%!- click HERE
  • NEW Tour Plan Process- click HERE
  • New River Trail Celebration Planned- click HERE
  • BSA Seeking Jamboree Stories- Click HERE
  • Silver Beaver Nominations- Deadline for nominations is Aug. 31- Click HERE
     for details.
  • Registration is now OPEN for the Commonwealth Games- click HERE
  • Voice of the Scout- BSA wants your opinion!- click HERE
  • ScoutStrong- a new BSA program to encourage and support physical fitness, and you can recieve the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award..in less than 2 months! click HERE
     for details. 
  • Stories of Scouts who entered Military Service needed- click HERE
     

Upcoming Activities: (Click on name of event for details)

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Fwd: Camp Card Turn In- Dan River District

ATTENTION:  Any unit in Dan River District that has paid for their Camp Cards sold and turned in unsold cards, please contact Bill Oswald by Thursday night, 17 May 2012 to do so.   Camp Card accounts can be settled with Bill at the District Volunteer Recognition Banquet on 17 May at 6:30 P.M. at First Presbyterian Church, Main St. Danville.

 

If you have not made reservations for the banquet, please contact Bill by 4 P.M. today (Wednesday, 16 May).  Bill needs to place the food order with Outback Restaurant.  Cost for the banquet is $12 per person.   Lots of people will be getting awards.    Come and honor these volunteers by attending the banquet and giving them thanks for all they do to help our youth scouts. 

 

Contact Bill at:  danriverde@bsa-brmc.org or phone 434-429-6430.  

 

 

 

Bill Oswald 

District Executive

Dan River District

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Blue Ridge Mountains Council

2131 Valley View Blvd., NW
Roanoke, VA 24012
(540) 265-0656
 Fax (540) 265-0659

Cell:  434-429-6430


 




--
David Hyler
(434) 710-4408

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Programs for Scouts

The Science Center regularly hosts presentations by experts, enthusiasts and scientists.  We have a particularly interesting set of programs over the next few months.  Join us and bring your Scouts. All talks are FREE.

 

Methods of Chiropractic Medicine, February 14, 6:30 p.m.

Local chiropractor, Dr. Stephen Eggleston shares how small applications of pressure and adjustments in alignment can bring about large results in the human body.

 

Dinosaurs Under the Microscope, February 24, 6:30 p.m.

Dr. Mary Schweitzer of North Carolina State University is renowned for her discovery of flexible dinosaur tissue within dinosaur bone. Dr. Schweitzer talks about the evidence for soft tissue in fossils and how this impacts our understanding of ancient animals and their environments.

 

Talkin¹ Turkey, March, 13, 6:30 p.m.

Did you know turkeys communicate with each other? Come learn about the variety of sounds turkeys produce and the meanings behind them. Local outdoor enthusiasts James Lumpkins and Dave Clark will speak about making box calls, wing-bone calls and diaphragm calls and will demonstrate how to use them.

 

The Music of Nature and the Nature of Music, March 27, 6:30 p.m.

Dr. Patricia Gray from the Music Research Institute at UNC-Greensboro, shares her studies of other species and their abilities to perceive and manipulate patterns of sound and time thus advancing our understanding of the deeper roots of human musicality. 

 

Peering into the Musical Brain, April 10, 6:30 p.m.

Over the past 15 years, Dr. Don Hodges has worked on mapping the musical brain in an effort to understand how neural mechanisms support various components of musical behavior. Although there is still much to learn, a picture of the musical brain is beginning to emerge.

 

The Sounds of Bat Sonar, April 24, 6:30 p.m.

Bats live in a world of sound that is mostly inaudible to humans. They use sounds above our hearing range to navigate through their environments, find their food, and communicate with each other. Dr. Rolf Mueller shares his work on the communication systems of these amazing night flyers.

 

Jeff Liverman, Executive Director

Danville Science Center, 434.799.5160

www.dsc.smv.org

 

 




--
David Hyler
(434) 710-4408

Friday, February 3, 2012

Fwd: For List - Weblos Camp-In in Martinsville Museum

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "William Oswald" <woswald@bsamail.org>
Date: Feb 3, 2012 2:03 PM
Subject: For List - Weblos Camp-In in Martinsville Museum
To: "David Hyler" <dhyler99@gmail.com>
Cc: "Rob Gunnell (tazman1225@msn.com)" <tazman1225@msn.com>

News Flash for Dan River Weblos Scouts: 

 

 

WEBELOS Camp-In @ the Museum of Natural History in Martinsville VA:  March 16.  Arrive Friday night, pizza dinner and tour, breakfast and decamp Saturday morning.  The Museum has reduced the price to $23 per Scout, $10 per adult and includes all costs.  Geology pin can be earned @ Camp-In.  A great night at the Museum!   Please sign-up as soon as possible.  Call 434-429-6430 (Me) or 229-9830 (Patrick Henry District Executive Lew Hege) to sign-up.

 

 

Bill Oswald 

District Executive

Dan River District

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Blue Ridge Mountains Council

2131 Valley View Blvd., NW
Roanoke, VA 24012
(540) 265-0656
 Fax (540) 265-0659

Cell:  434-429-6430


 

February 2012 Roundtable

Announcements

  • February
    • 08 OA Chapter Meeting
    • 22 Last day to turn in charge
    • 23 District Committee Meeting
  • March
    • 01 Roundtable
    • 14 OA Chapter Meeting
    • 15 District Committee Meeting
    • 31 Pinewood Derby
  • University of Scouting

 

  • Saturday, March 03, 2012, 09:00am - 04:00pm

 

  • The largest Council-sponsored Leader Training Event of the Year. Time 9AM- 4PM Location: Lord Botetourt High School  Daleville. (I-81 Exit 150)

 

  • Location : Lord Botetourt High School- Daleville, VA 1435 Roanoke Road Daleville VA

 

  • Contact : Lucas Snipes From Bedford/Lynchburg  460W to Alt 220N (Cloverdale Rd)  turn Rt. on 220N for 6 miles. From other locations: I-81 North. Exit 150B to US11 South, Rt. On US220N at the Truck Stop of America. Follow US220 N for about 1 mile- LBHS on the l Contact Email edbotetourt@carringtonplaces.com Contact Phone Number 540-966-0056 Event Type Training Can Family Participate No Cost to Participate TBD Age Limit Website for More Information(with http://) Training Adult
  •  Scouts on Skis

 

  • Sunday, March 11, 2012, 08:00am - 05:00pm For complete details and registration information, click HERE Contact : Ed Harriman Contact Email edh@bsa-brmc.org
  •  Scout EXPO

 

  • Saturday, March 17, 2012, 10:00am - 04:00pm

 

  • Click HERE for complete information and registration details Tanglewood Mall- Roanoke

 

  • Contact : Wanda Centers Contact Email wdcenters2@verizon.net Contact Phone Number 540.761.4416 Event Type Activity Can Family Participate Yes

 

  • Wilderness First Aid

 

  • From Friday, March 23, 2012 - 08:00am To Sunday, March 25, 2012 - 05:00pm For complete details and registration information, click HERE Contact : Greg Harmon Contact Email harmongw@earthlink.net Contact Phone Number 540-529.5985 Event Type Activity Can Family Participate No

 

  • Cost to Participate 125

Commissioners Story or Activity

T-Shirt Relay

    • Required: 1 extra-large t-shirt for each team. A judge for each team.

     

    • Notes: The judge should make sure the shirt is pulled all the way down on each scout and no short-cuts are taken in the heat of competition. This works on teamwork and everyone is involved the whole time.

     

    • Instructions: Teams line up in single file. The shirt is given to the first scout in each line. On 'Go' signal, the scout puts the shirt on and then holds hands with the next scout in line, facing the scout. All the other scouts work the shirt from one scout to the next so he is wearing it. He then turns and holds hands with the next scout, and so on.

     

    • Teams need to have the same number of players or some need to put the shirt on twice.

Commissioners Guest

  • Barry Thompson will present Woodworking
02022012724.jpg

Woodworking  

  1. Do the following:
    1. Show that you know first aid for injuries that could occur while woodworking, including splinters, scratches, cuts, severe bleeding, and shock. Tell what precautions must be taken to help prevent loss of eyesight or hearing, and explain why and when it is necessary to use a dust mask.
    2. Earn the Totin' Chip recognition.
    3. Tell your counselor what precautions you take to safely use your tools.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Describe how timber is grown, harvested, and milled. Tell how lumber is cured, seasoned, graded, and sized.
    2. Collect and label blocks of six kinds of wood useful in woodworking. Describe the chief qualities of each. Give the best uses of each.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Show the proper care, use, and storage of all working tools and equipment that you own or use at home or school.
    2. Sharpen correctly the cutting edges of two different tools.
  4. Using a saw, plane, plane, hammer, brace, and bit, make something useful of wood. Cut parts from lumber that you have squared and measured from working drawings.
  5. Create your own carpentry project. List the materials you will need to complete your project, and then build your project. Keep track of the time you spend and the cost of the materials.
  6. Do any TWO of the following:
    1. Make working drawings of a project needing (1) Beveled or rounded edges OR curved or incised cuttings, OR (2) miter, dowel, or mortise and tenon joints. Build this project.
    2. Make something for which you have to turn duplicate parts on a lathe.
    3. Make a cabinet, box or something else with a door or lid fastened with inset hinges.
    4. Help make and repair wooden toys for underprivileged children OR help carry out a carpentry service project approved by your counselor for a charitable organization.
  7. Talk with a cabinetmaker or carpenter. Find out about the training, apprenticeship, career opportunities, work conditions, work hours, pay rates, and union organization that woodworking experts have in your area.


Woodworking Worksheet

Commissioners Recipe


Pocket Pizza


  • Required: aluminum foil campfire coals long fire tongs

 

  • Ingredients: 1 pkg pita bread 1 can spaghetti sauce 1 cup grated cheese 1 pkg sliced pepperoni optional: sliced black olives, pineapple chunks, diced peppers, ...

 

  • Notes: Use precooked meat since you are just heating it up. Mark your own foil with a special fold so you know its yours.

 

Instructions: Cut each pita in half and spoon spaghetti sauce into pocket spreading it evenly. Add cheese, pepperoni, and other toppings. Wrap in foil and place in coals. Cook for a couple minutes, flip, and cook another two minutes.

Scout Song


The Scout Leaders Song

Lyrics:
Aren't Scoutleaders grand
For the programs they plan
And the hours they put in each night?
If they're ever home
You know they're on the phone
For the boys who they want to teach right. 

Chorus:
We're at home in the woods.
On weekends with our troops we stay.
Though we never get rest,
The boys are doing their best,
And that's what we're getting for pay! 


They hike to their site
Though it takes half the night
Through the wind and the rain and the snow!
These leaders so brave
They could live in a cave
Except that their wives just say, "No!"
Chorus

Camp food tastes just great,
Like an old paper plate,
And the bug juice is not fit to drink.
So why every year,
For a week we come here
It's not for vacation, we think! 
Chorus

They feel like old men,
On a camp out, they've been
To be clean, to be warm, to be dry!
But to tell you the truth,
they're re-living their youth
So in answer they merely reply! 
Chorus

Commissioners Minute

The Unexpected Guest


One night, a soldier had been out scouting the area for enemies. On his way back to camp he stopped at a humble cottage and asked for shelter. An older couple answered the door, took pity on him and told him that he can stay the night. The stranger was exhausted and retired as soon as he was shown his room.

 

Before the mistress of the home went to sleep, she locked up all of her valuables in case this man was a thief. As she was locking up her valuables, she heard speaking in the next room. She listened closer and heard a prayer offered in gentle yet solemn tones. It was the stranger praying for his country, for the soldiers who were fighting for the noble cause. The woman became ashamed of her suspicious fears, got up and put the key back in the cupboard door. She slept peacefully and soundly through the night.

 

The next morning, the stranger could not stay, but offered to pay for his night's lodging. The old couple refused. "Then," said the guest, "you deserve to know who I am, who you have entertained and treated so nobly. I am General Washington."


Monday, January 30, 2012

Requirements for the Welding merit badge

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while welding, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, or lessen these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for, and the prevention of, injuries or illnesses that could occur while welding, including electrical shock, eye injuries, burns, fume inhalation, dizziness, skin irritation, and exposure to hazardous chemicals, including filler metals and welding gases.
  2. Do the following:
    1. With your counselor, discuss general safety precautions and Material Safety Data Sheets related to welding. Explain the importance of the MSDS.
    2. Describe the appropriate safety gear and clothing that must be worn when welding. Then, present yourself properly dressed for welding—in protective equipment, clothing, and footwear.
    3. Explain and demonstrate the proper care and storage of welding equipment, tools, and protective clothing and footwear.
  3. Explain the terms welding, electrode, slag, and oxidation. Describe the welding process, how heat is generated, what kind of filler metal is added (if any), and what protects the molten metal from the atmosphere.
  4. Name the different mechanical and thermal cutting methods. Choose one method and describe how to use the process. Discuss one advantage and one limitation of this process.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Select two welding processes, and make a list of the different components of the equipment required for each process. Discuss one advantage and one limitation for each process.
    2. Choose one welding process. Set up the process you have chosen, including gas regulators, work clamps, cables, filler materials, and equipment settings. Have your counselor inspect and approve the area for the welding process you have chosen.
  6. After successfully completing requirements 1 through 5, use the equipment you prepared for the welding process in 5b to do the following:
    1. Using a metal scribe or soapstone, sketch your initial onto a metal plate, and weld a bead on the plate following the pattern of your initial.
    2. Cover a small plate (approximately 3" x 3" x ¼") with weld beads side by side.
    3. Tack two plates together in a square groove butt joint.
    4. Weld the two plates together from 6c on both sides.
    5. Tack two plates together in a T joint, have your counselor inspect it, then weld a T joint with fillet weld on both sides.
    6. Tack two plates together in a lap joint, have your counselor inspect it, then weld a lap joint with fillet weld on both sides.
  7. Do the following:
    1. Find out about three career opportunities in the welding industry. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why the profession might interest you.
    2. Discuss the role of the American Welding Society in the welding profession.

Unit College Scouter Reserv

Does your troop or team have a Scout who has turned 18 and is away at college, on a mission, or in the service and wants to stay registered in the unit?
That situation occurs quite often, and until now the choices were to register them as an assistant Scoutmaster, register them with the council as College Reserve, or drop them.
Each of those choices presented potential problems. Assistant Scoutmasters need to be trained and that could be difficult at school or overseas. College Scouter Reserve meant that they were not registered in the unit. Dropping them from the charter often resulted in losing contact with them.
To help keep these young men in Scouting, a new registration code has been introduced – 92U, Unit College Scouter Reserve. Of course Youth Protection Training is required, but that is the only required course for the position. All of the registration application criteria and fees apply.
Full information is available in the October News and Notes registrars' newsletter.


Thursday, January 5, 2012

January Roundtable

                January

      11th OA Chapter Meeting
      19th District Committee Meeting
      20th Winter Camporee (Special Announcements)

            February

      2nd Roundtable Boy
      8th OA Chapter Meeting
      23rd District Committee Meeting


Commissioners Activity (5 Minutes)

Doctor!

Arm-Sling Relay Game
Patrols line up on the starting line with one scout playing patient about 30 feet away. The patient needs to get his arm bound in a sling.

On start signal, first scout in patrol runs to patient and uses his neckerchief to bind arm in sling. When the referee sees that the sling is correct, he signals the rescuing scout to remove the sling.

The victim runs back to tag the next patrol member while the rescuing scout becomes the victim.

If this is run as a race, know what the largest patrol size is and all patrols need to rescue that number of victims - some will go twice.



Commissioners Joke (5 Minutes)

Blind Pilots Joke
Two men dressed in pilots' uniforms walk up the aisle of the aircraft. Both are wearing dark glasses, one is using a guide dog, and the other is tapping his way along the aisle with a cane.

Nervous laughter spreads through the cabin, but the men enter the cockpit the door closes, and the engines start up. The passengers begin glancing nervously around, searching for some kind of a sign that this is just a little practical joke. None is forthcoming.

The plane moves faster and faster down the runway, and the people sitting in the window seats realize they're headed straight for the water at the edge of the airport property. Just as it begins to look as though the plane will plow straight into the water, panicked screams fill the cabin.

At that moment, the plane lifts smoothly into the air. The passengers relax and laugh a little sheepishly, and soon all retreat into their magazines and books, secure in the knowledge that the plane is in good hands.

Meanwhile, in the cockpit, one of the blind pilots turns to the other and
says, 'You know, Bob, one of these days, they're gonna scream too late and we're all gonna die' !!

Commissioners Merit Badge: Chess

Requirements for the Chess merit badge:

1.       Discuss with your merit badge counselor the history of the game of chess. Explain why it is considered a game of planning and strategy.

2.       Discuss with your merit badge counselor the following:

a.       The benefits of playing chess, including developing critical thinking skills, concentration skills, and decision-making skills, and how these skills can help you in other areas of your life

b.       Sportsmanship and chess etiquette

3.       Demonstrate to your counselor that you know each of the following. Then, using Scouting's Teaching EDGE, teach the following to a Scout who does not know how to play chess:

a.       The name of each chess piece

b.       How to set up a chessboard

c.        How each chess piece moves, including castling and en passant captures

4.       Do the following:

a.       Demonstrate scorekeeping using the algebraic system of chess notation.

b.       Discuss the differences between the opening, the middle game, and the endgame.

c.        Explain four opening principles.

d.       Explain the four rules for castling.

e.        On a chessboard, demonstrate a "scholar's mate" and a "fool's mate."

f.        Demonstrate on a chessboard four ways a chess game can end in a draw.

5.       Do the following:

a.       Explain four of the following elements of chess strategy: exploiting weaknesses, force, king safety, pawn structure, space, tempo, time.

b.       Explain any five of these chess tactics: clearance sacrifice, decoy, discovered attack, double attack, fork, interposing, overloading, overprotecting, pin, remove the defender, skewer, zwischenzug.

c.        Set up a chessboard with the white king on e1, the white rooks on a1 and h1, and the black king on e5. With White to move first, demonstrate how to force checkmate on the black king.

d.       Set up and solve five direct-mate problems provided by your merit badge counselor.

6.       Do ONE of the following:

a.       Play at least three games of chess with other Scouts and/or your merit badge counselor. Replay the games from your score sheets and discuss with your counselor how you might have played each game differently.

b.       Play in a scholastic (youth) chess tournament and use your score sheets from that tournament to replay your games with your merit badge counselor. Discuss with your counselor how you might have played each game differently.

c.        Organize and run a chess tournament with at least four players, plus you. Have each competitor play at least two games.

 

Commissioners Guest (15 minutes)

      Bill Stanfield (Trail First Aid)


Download PowerPoint on First Aid >>HERE<<

Commissioners Minute (7:55)

Commissioners Minute

Here are 10 tips to improve how you relate to other people.
1.       Smile at people - it takes sixty-five muscles to frown, only fifteen to smile
2.       Call people by name - to do that, you need to learn their name
3.       Speak to people - take a chance and approach someone new
4.       Be friendly - if you would have friends, be one
5.       Be cordial - speak and act as if everything that you do is a real pleasure
6.       Be interested in people - find out what makes them tick
7.       Be generous with praise - stingy with criticism.
8.       Be considerate of the feelings of others - think what impact your words will have before you speak them
9.       Be thoughtful of the opinions of others - there are three sides to a controversy; yours, the other person's, and the right one.
10.    Be ready to serve - helping someone strengthens that bond of friendship.     

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